Tobacco Road ph tape and mixing house plant food

April 25, 2011 by Mario  
Filed under Flower Gardening


To start explaining what I know about mixing plant food I mix up a pretty good batch of ph balance Miricle Grow

hanging tobacco

February 22, 2011 by Mario  
Filed under Organic Gardening


a short video on how we are drying our tobacco tis year

Virginia Tobacco

August 8, 2010 by Mario  
Filed under Flower Gardening


My activities in Harvesting Virginia Tobaccos. Placed in Lurtigen, Canton Fribourg, Switzerland. in Mr. Fritz Herren Farm Brightleaf is commonly known as “Virginia tobacco”, often regardless of which state they are planted. Prior to the American Civil War, most tobacco grown in the US was fire-cured dark-leaf. This type of tobacco was planted in fertile lowlands, used a robust variety of leaf, and was either fire cured or air cured. Sometime after the War of 1812, demand for a milder, lighter, more aromatic tobacco arose. Ohio, Pennsylvania and Maryland all innovated quite a bit with milder varieties of the tobacco plant. Farmers around the country experimented with different curing processes. But the breakthrough didn’t come until around 1839. Brightleaf tobacco leaf ready for harvest. When it turns yellow-green the sugar content is at its peak, and it will cure to a deep golden color with mild taste. The leaves are harvested progressively up the stem from the base, as they ripen. Brightleaf tobacco leaf ready for harvest. When it turns yellow-green the sugar content is at its peak, and it will cure to a deep golden color with mild taste. The leaves are harvested progressively up the stem from the base, as they ripen. It had been noticed for centuries that sandy, highland soil produced thinner, weaker plants. Captain Abisha Slade, of Caswell County, North Carolina had a good deal of infertile, sandy soil, and planted the new “gold-leaf” varieties on it. Slade owned a