Fall Container Gardening

February 15, 2011 by Mario  
Filed under Gardening Tips


Visit us at byf.unl.edu! UNL Extension Landscape Horticulture Specialist Kim Todd talks about creative combinations for fall containers. Produced by Backyard Farmer, Nebraska’s premier gardening program

Fall Vegetable Garden Tour

December 28, 2010 by Mario  
Filed under Gardening Tips


Take a tour of what’s growing in the Veggie Gardening Tips fall vegetable garden. Just because it’s November and winter is right around the corner doesn’t mean that you can’t continue growing and enjoying vegetables right out in your own backyard!

Fall No Till Garden Prep

December 7, 2010 by Mario  
Filed under Organic Gardening

Fall Soil Preparation

December 4, 2010 by Mario  
Filed under Organic Gardening


Preparing rows in garden for fall beans, potatoes and tomatoes

Wormfarmergeorge takes you on a Fall Garden Tour

November 12, 2010 by Mario  
Filed under Organic Gardening


What’s a fall garden? Lettuce, Onions, Shallots, Peppers, Spinach, Carrots, Califlower, Cabbage, Turnps, Radishes, Mustard Greens, Cilantro, Fennel, Dill, Swiss Chard, Chinese Cabbage and more.

Fall 09 Garden Update

October 7, 2010 by Mario  
Filed under Organic Gardening


Here is whats happenin’ at of Micro Farm.

Planting Lettuce in the Fall

August 16, 2010 by Mario  
Filed under Organic Gardening


Lettuce loves cool weather. Find out how you can make your own home-grown lettuce a feature of your next fabulous Thanksgiving feast!

2009 Fall Hammock Cleanup

July 15, 2010 by Mario  
Filed under 16


The hammock is called “An Especially Beautiful Hammock” and is located on “Little Tybee Island” in Georgia. The is our annual fall cleanup. The weather will cool down soon and the best camping time of the year will be here. Now the hammock is nice and clean, the trails are cleared and all trash removed. By all means find the hammock and enjoy. You can bet that we “Hammock Keepers” will be doing the same. Thanks need to go out to Scott and Stephanie for their help. As well as to Lamar for the loan of all the gardening tools and for the new hammock flag. See More here; www.flickr.com

Fall Lawn and Garden Pests

February 18, 2010 by Mario  
Filed under Gardening Ideas

With the cool weather of the fall season, most lawn and garden pests and diseases begin to dwindle away. Yet, there are a few lawn and garden pests that thrive off of the cool temperatures of the fall season.
One good point about fall lawn and garden pests is that they will not have the chance to last as long as spring and summer pests because the freezing temperatures of winter will kill them off long before they do a tremendous amount of damage.

Still, though, if these fall lawn and garden pests have been at it all summer long, they may stick around through the fall and wreak havoc on the remaining lawn and garden perennials, bulbs and trees.

Fall Armyworms

The most beautiful part about the fall season is the different colors of foliage that will begin to appear in September and October. Unfortunately, Fall Armyworms love to prey on this beautiful foliage during the fall months, as their name suggests, and can do damage very rapidly.

They usually appear in September and will stick around until the first big frost. The major problem with this fall lawn and garden pest is that they almost always feed at night, making it hard to identify the problem until you wake in the morning to leaves that have been chewed around the edges.

The upside to Fall Armyworms as a fall lawn and garden pest is that they are usually easy to spot, as they are a large tan to dark brown colored worm with a large stripe either brown or red in color on each side.
Fall Armyworms often like to make themselves present in cornfields in the early fall months and can cause major damage to the remaining corn crops. For those farmers and gardeners who are aware of Fall Armyworms, a pretreatment of pesticides will usually kill the larvae that are preparing to hatch. Unfortunately, the pretreatment needs to be established by late July or August to prevent damage in September.

Grubworms

Grubworms like the cool weather season and feed more in the spring and fall months. Fortunately as a fall lawn and garden pest they do not do as much damage as they do in the spring, but they can still be a concern for some climate zones, especially those that stay above freezing well into November.

Keep in mind that grubworms will usually survive over the winter and turn into adult beetles, repeating the entire life cycle in the spring, and this is why grubworms can be such a problem for all seasons.

Most of the time, they will hatch in the late summer and begin feeding on lawn and garden roots in the fall. This is when gardeners will notice patches of dead grass or grass that is squishy or can easily be pulled up since the roots are missing.

If at all possible, apply grubworm control in the mid to late summer, something with the active ingredient imidacloprid, which is a chloro-nicotinyl compound. This will kill the larvae before they get a chance to hatch in the late summer and will keep the life cycle from perpetuating.

Sod Webworms

Similar to the grubworms, sod webworms have a year long life cycle that means they can become fall lawn and garden pests as well as being bothersome during the spring and summer. Instead of arriving in the form of beetles, the sod webworms come from adult moths that usually begin laying eggs in the spring.

The difference is that their eggs hatch fairly quickly but the webworms are so small that their infestation may go undetected until they cocoon and reemerge as moths in the late summer to produce another generation that is more destructive. This is why you may see sod webworm problems in the fall months.

While it is helpful to use preventive sod webworm control through Microbial pesticides, the problem is that many of these pesticides will not only kill the moths of sod webworms, they may also kill butterflies and even non-pest moths.

The best method of prevention is to simply clean up leaves, grass clippings, mulch and plant debris in the fall months to keep the webworms from making webs in these places and producing more larvae.

Ted Roberson owner of landscape living is a landscape and garden enthusiast who has years of experience working and creating outdoor living areas. Discover how you can improve and maintain your landscape and garden area with simple projects.

http://www.landscapeliving.com/

Fall Flower Gardening- 12 “Attractive” Features Of Fall Flower Gardening!

February 17, 2010 by Mario  
Filed under Flower Gardening

Autumn is a wonderful season! All the different hues of nature can be witnessed in the trees around! Flowers give out heady fragrances, and there is generally an atmosphere of magic all around! This season is therefore a boon for garden lovers, since there are any number of plants which are created just for fall flower gardening!

Some features of fall flower gardening are listed below–

(1) Why fall flower gardening at all? These magnificent plants give a new look to the landscape around the house. The gardener gets immense pleasure from what he/she has created. And best of all, one is surrounded by intoxicating perfumes!

(2) Fall season stretches to a few months. So when is the best time to begin fall flower gardening? People who live in highly warm climates are lucky! The (annual) flowers can be planted during autumn itself. Additionally, they even grow and bloom in the same season; so the owner can enjoy everything at one and the same time!

Those dwelling in places with colder climates will have to plant the flowers before fall, and wait to enjoy their color and fragrance during the autumn.

(3) In actual fact, there is no standard answer to the above question–it is just a matter of guesswork. Every year, there could be a different time period that seems appropriate for fall flower gardening. All that an avid gardener can do is wait till the opportunity presents itself, and then grab it!

To illustrate with an example, a mild summer may be followed by a period of rainfall. This occurs somewhere towards the end of August. This then would be an ideal time for growing flowers. In other areas, September would seem to be the ideal month for growing flowers.

(4) There is another choice available–an entirely new flower garden can be started just before autumn.

When the summer season comes to an end, local garden centers offer those plants which could not be sold during the spring season, at discounted rates. Unless there are pests on these plants, they can be safely taken home and brought back to good health via container gardening. Once the weather turns cooler, the same plants can be transplanted into the outdoor garden.

(5) Fall flower gardening can include annual plants as well as perennials. Annual flowers are tender and may survive for a briefer period than perennial flowers. Perennial plants are sturdier and able to tolerate early frost–so their flowers can be enjoyed for a lengthier period of time.

(6) With a little research, the gardener can obtain plants that grow late blossoms, but generally before the arrival of the first frost. These flowers are actually planted during the summer; so, it is possible that excess foliage will need to be trimmed during fall season. This is done by pruning or staking. A disadvantage is that pruning leads to late blooming.

(7) Fall flowering garden can include plants that grow vegetables too. Some of them are peppers, cabbage and kales. As a matter of fact, ornamental peppers exhibit wonderfully colored flowers and fruits. Thus, enjoy them and taste them too!

(8) Some popular flowering plants are–perennial asters that blossom every fall, year after year, and pansies; pansies bloom during the fall, winter and spring seasons.

(9) Some exotic and colorful additions to the garden can be attempted if the gardener so desires. These could be–reddish-purple love-lies-bleeding flowers, pinkish-purple mums, and New England asters.

(10) There are other blooms that can really be breathtaking in appearance! They are therefore welcome additions to the flower garden.

Nasturtiums (give out orange and yellow flowers).
Silver king artemisia.
Reddish-purple plumed celosia.
Bronze coleus.
Marigold (give out yellow, gold and orange flowers).

(11) Perennial plants come in a vast range. The gardener can take his pick from among sunflowers, aconite, yellow wax bells, phlox, autumn crocus, tall verbena, golden rod, Russian sage, black-eyed susan or the ragged coneflower.

(12) To enhance the fall flower gardening experience, the gardener can visualize the difference that vines, shrubs and ornamental grasses will create when invited to become part of the already vivid panorama!