In Depth Guide to Home Composting (Part 2 of 3)

July 12, 2010 by Mario  
Filed under Organic Gardening


? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? alturl.com ?????????????????????? Click link above to get your FREE $500 Dollar Home Depot Gift Card! You can use it to buy supplies! ;) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? What Materials Can You Compost? Pretty much all your organic household and garden waste is an elligible candidate for composting although there are a few exceptions. Things to particularly avoid are meat, fish, bones, fats and oils, dairy products like milk and cheese, dog and cat droppings as these can attract animals, create foul smells as they degrade and carry nasty diseases. Also, whilst weeds and plants can be added, it is advised to dry out persisent weeds and remove seed heads before adding these. Ashes are also best avoided, as are glossy magazines although shredded paper and cardboard are fine to add. Feel free to add waste fruit and vegetables, crushed egg shells, coffee grounds (worms love them!) and tea bags, hair, leaves, grass clippings and other organic waste. As a general rule, if in doubt, leave it out but most organic waste will rot down just fine and if you shred it or cut it up smaller, it will compost faster. How Long Before It Becomes Compost? This depends on the balance of materials in your compost heap, the weather and the amount of time you can devote to the project. If you want to take an active managed approach to your composting then you can have afully composted

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Comments

5 Responses to “In Depth Guide to Home Composting (Part 2 of 3)”
  1. ConocimientoEsPoder1 says:

    I prefer to make my own compost :) it’s a good example for my son.

  2. DooDooHeadAlert says:

    just buy some miracle grow

  3. Praxxus55712 says:

    Styme is wrong. ALL compost teas are “extracts. That’s the entire nature of compost tea. Passive or steeped compost tea is prepared by immersing a burlap sack filled with compost into a bucket or tank, stirring occassionally. Usually the brew time is longer, from 7 to 10 days. This method predates brewed compost tea and dates back hundreds of years in Europe. Steeped and brewed compost tea are BOTH true compost teas.

  4. stymye says:

    also.. soaking compost in water makes compost “extract.” True compost Tea involves aeration and the addition of sugars to build a huge microbial content over a few days.

  5. stymye says:

    be carefull with the tapwater, it most likely contains a fair amount of chlorine. I always use rainwater on the compost and to water my plants. or let the tapwater set for a couple days so the chlorine evaporates

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